CAISSE À REMORDS

Picasso and Jacqueline Roque moved to Notre-Dame-de-Vie outside of Mougins in 1960, and in the process discovered a cache of unprinted plates in the artist’s atelier in Cannes. Picasso went through the plates—created over the last few decades—with Jacques Frélaut...

EAUX-FORTES ORIGINALS POUR LES TEXTS DE BUFFON
(Bloch 328–358, Baer 575–605, Cramer 37)

In 1931, Ambroise Vollard had suggested that Picasso illustrate Histoire Naturelle, générale et particulière by Georges-Louis Leclerc, comte...

LES MÉTAMORPHOSES
(Bloch 99–Bloch 128) (Baer 143–Baer 172)

In 1928, Alfred Skira, a young bibliophile who had recently established himself as a book publisher in Lausanne, Switzerland, approached Picasso to produce an illustrated...

MARIE-THÉRÈSE WALTER

In 1927, Picasso—who was in his mid-forties, married, and had a young son—began a clandestine affair with Marie-Thérèse Walter, a young woman of only seventeen. Picasso was drawn to Walter upon first sight, brashly introducing himself to the girl as she emerged from the Métro. He proposed that he paint her portrait; shortly thereafter she came to the studio and their intense relationship began. 

PICASSO’S CLASSICAL PERIOD
1914-1925

During World War I, Picasso’s focus switched from Cubism to a style influenced by classical Greek and Roman art and mythology, characterized by serene and weighty figures wearing flowing robes in timeless and minimal landscapes. This shift signaled a greater trend throughout Western Europe that would be a dominant force in art for over a decade. As always, Picasso was a leader in this new direction. 

PICASSO’S CUBIST PHASE
1907- c. 1915

Cubism, a movement founded by Picasso and his close friend Georges Braque in 1907, was a radical breakthrough in art that undermined nearly five centuries of tradition. The term was 

REMBRANDT IN THE SUITE VOLLARD

“[When I work] I have a feeling that Delacroix, Giotto, Tintoretto, El Greco, and the rest, as well as all the modern painters, the good and the bad, the abstract and the non-abstract, are 

SCULPTOR'S STUDIO
From the Suite Vollard

The forty-six plates that comprise the “Sculptor’s Studio” prints of the Suite Vollard provide insight into Picasso’s thoughts about the relationship between art and life, as well as

SUITE DES SALTIMBANQUES

The Suite des Saltimbanques, a series of fifteen loosely-related etchings and drypoints created from late 1904 through 1905, was Picasso’s first major body of work in printmaking and is integrally connected to his paintings and 

THE SUITE VOLLARD
(Bloch 134 – Bloch 234)

Around 1927, the famed dealer Ambroise Vollard commissioned a suite of one hundred prints from Picasso that have become known as the Suite Vollard, or the Vollard Suite. The 

THE MINOTAUR

In 1933 Albert Skira, who had made his debut as a publisher two years prior with Picasso’s livre d’artiste Les Métamorphoses, asked the artist to create the inaugural cover for his new journal Minotaure. The new publication 

THE BLIND MINOTAUR

The four plates that comprise the “Blind Minotaur” series within the Suite Vollard, a subset of the fifteen Minotaur images, are among the most fascinating prints in Picasso’s oeuvre. Though they share the same elements